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Performance

There are 7 entries for the tag Performance

The importance of performance testing in a Windows Phone 7 application

A few months I described how I handled the encoding bug of the WebBrowser control in WP7. Unfortunately it was not just a problem with the “smart quotes” but also with all non western characters, and the naïve solution to the problem caused a performance problem. Let’s see how I solved it. The problem I needed a more general purpose character replacing procedure, like the second one I mentioned in the previous post: foreach (char value in strText) { int decValue = int.Parse(string.Format("{0:x4}", (int)value), ...

Stopping the panic: how to improve HtmlHelper.RenderPartial performances. Don’t run in debug mode

There has a been a lot of talking on a possible “big design flaw” in ASP.NET MVC: partial view path resolution was not cached and so a big performance issue. It all started with Rudi Benkovic’s presentation on ASP.NET MVC performances. I also wrote a commentary on his presentation, but I was a bit skeptical about the fact that view path resolution was faster with a full url than with just the name of the view. I said: This last one looks strange to me because the RenderPartial method should be caching the path resolution:...

The performance implications of the expression tree-based ActionLink helper

Earlier today I wrote a post about how to improve the performance of ASP.NET MVC web applications, and I came out with the conclusion that the best way to improve performance is to add data caching and that the rest was not very important. Rudi sent me an email pointing out that turning the optimization upside down as I asked in my post, the expression tree-based ActionLink method still causes a lot of performance problems, at least in his sample application, a DIGG-like application, where there are 4 calls to the ActionLink helper for each of the 20 items...

How to improve the performance of ASP.NET MVC web applications

Today I stumbled upon a nice presentation that Rudi Benkovic gave last week at the Slovenian DotNet User Group, about ASP.NET MVC Performance. The Big Picture It is an in depth analysis of a Digg-like site and how it went from serving (on a test machine) 6 req/sec to 390 req/sec. The biggest gain, 74 req/sec to 390 req/sec happened when he introduced data caching and another 25 req/sec where gained when he introduced the compilation of LINQ queries. Data caching is always the key Splitting the gains among the various components: ...

If you are still wondering how fast is ADO.NET vs ADODB

There is this nice paper written by Jason McGuire titled: Performance Comparison of Microsoft’s ADO and ADO.NET Database Connectors The quick answer to the question is: inside a .NET application, ADO.NET is 3 to 4 times faster then ADODB when accessing SQL Server. Well, not a big news you might say, going from .NET to COM and back is obviously a performance problem and also there was a bit of advancements since mid ‘90s, but it’s nice to find someone that published such analysis with such a great degree of details and precision. If you are...

Dissecting YSlow

In the last weeks there has been a lot of talking around YSlow, the tool that the Yahoo! Developer Network released to check sites against their 13 rules of High Performance Web Sites. Last week I used it against various blogs and I found out that my blog is rated only 36/100. So, also after the challenge started by Mads, I decided to try and improve my score. The final score is a weighted average between the scores for each of the 13 rules. This means that some rules are more important than others and to increase the score of a site...

How Slow is your site (How to improve the performance of your site with YSlow)

A few days ago I posted about Firebug, the Swiss Army Knife of the developers' plugins. Last week Yahoo released an add-on for Firebug: YSlow. YSlow measures web page performance based on the best practices evangelized by Yahoo!'s Exceptional Performance team. Since many of these best practices focus on the frontend, YSlow is integrated with Joe Hewitt's Firebug, the web development tool of choice for frontend developers. After checking your site against the 13 rules of High Performance Web Sites, it rates the performances of your site with an A to F grade. I run the tool on a...